What Can Leaders of Change Learn from World-Class Performers?

It’s often quoted that some 70% of major change initiatives fail to deliver their intended objectives. If this is true, and the risk of failure so high, what can be done to increase the chances of success? In this post David Trafford and Peter Boggis suggest that much can be learned from world-class performers – particularly from ballet where the …

The Purpose of Strategy: To Change an Organisation’s Trajectory

If the purpose of strategy is to change an organisation’s trajectory, from one that is taking it to its default future to one that is not only better but achievable, how are the strategic choices best made and how can the chosen strategy best be implemented? In this post, David Trafford and Peter Boggis present a framework for developing strategy …

Experiential Learning Journeys: A Source of Shared Insights and Collective Leadership

In this post, Peter Boggis and David Trafford argue that deploying the principles of experiential learning through one or more ‘Learning Journeys’ is an effective way of developing collective leadership from the shared insights and experiences gained. They also help executives gain the collective capabilities needed to assess the effectiveness of current strategy, explore different strategies and successfully operationalise their …

The Impact of Organisational Capabilities on Project Success

David Trafford, Peter Boggis and Frank Dannenhauer argue that one of the principal reasons why delivering projects aimed at implementing strategy remains a challenge is that insufficient attention is given to the embedded organisational capabilities that define an organisation’s trajectory. After all, the purpose of this type of project is to change the trajectory of the organisation – and increasingly …

‘Being Digital’ as an Organisational Capability

David Trafford and Peter Boggis argue that if organisations are serious about becoming ‘more digital’, they need to give focus and attention to developing ‘being digital’ as an organisational capability. They describe the seven conditions that need to be in place to develop and sustain this capability. All organisations are digital to some degree. The question is: how digital do …

Operationalising Strategy – Turning Strategic Intent into Operational Reality

David Trafford and Peter Boggis argue that there is often more to operationalising strategy than making structural changes, redesigning processes and training staff. For strategies to be truly successful, leaders need to create the conditions that enable the organisation to pull itself into an improved future – a future that not only reflects the strategic intent, but also becomes operational …

Making Your Strategic Signature Explicit

In this post David Trafford and Peter Boggis propose that the act of strategy development is essentially about deciding where an organisation aims to operate along a small set of strategic axes, where each strategic axis represents a source of value. Making these positions explicit as a strategic signature is an effective way of helping an organisation understand what it …

How Operating Principles Can Make Strategy Meaningful

Peter Boggis and David Trafford argue that the purpose of any strategy is to change an organisation’s trajectory, away from its current default future to one that is judged to be better. Unfortunately most strategies are too complicated, too detailed or too vague to be meaningful to the people who are expected to implement them. They lack a meaningful set …

Using Organisational Capabilities to Pull the Present into the Future

David Trafford and Peter Boggis argue that organisational capabilities have an important role to play when developing strategy or implementing change. They discuss how existing organisational capabilities can inhibit change by anchoring an organisation to its current trajectory – thereby taking it to its default future – and that new organisational capabilities are needed if an organisation is to have …

Confronting your Organisation’s Default Future


Ambition Magazine, April 2018 edition, pages 1, 4, 32-35. Have you ever wondered why some organisations – whether large corporations, family businesses or not-for-profit enterprises – are more successful than others? Why is it that once-great companies like Compaq, WorldCom, Eastern Airlines, Woolworth Group, Blockbuster and Marconi no longer exist? Why is it that companies like Xerox, Blackberry, Kodak, RBS, …